Thursday, July 24, 2014

Fall Maintenance

Fall will be here before you know it!  This article from The Weather Channel will help you prepare: 

Fall Maintenance

1. Check your heating system including filters, pilot lights and burners. Have the system serviced by a qualified professional. Cleaning and servicing now can save you money later.  Learn steps to boost your furnace's efficiency and how to replace your furnace filter.
 
2. Clean and vacuum dust from vents, baseboard heaters and cold-air returns. Dust build-up in ducts is a major cause of indoor pollutants and can increase incidences of cold-weather illnesses. Consider hiring a pro to clean hard-to-reach ductwork.

Read the full article here

Friday, May 16, 2014

Can I Replace My Own Windows?

By
www. About.com

Question: 

Can I save money by replacing my own windows?

Answer:

It's tempting. You get a high quote from a window company for installing replacement windows and think you can shave costs by doing it yourself. Or you've seen one of these companies in action on a neighbor's house and noted how simple it is to put in a window.
All true. While it takes a certain amount of practice to get it right, window installation is not rocket science. A few things to consider:
 

Off-The-Rack Windows Won't Work

  You can't just go down to your local home improvement store at midnight and buy replacement windows off the rack. You can buy new construction windows off the rack, which you probably don't want unless you are prepared to do a substantial structural rebuild around the window, as shown in this image.

Read the full article here

Friday, May 2, 2014

28 Easy Summer Weekend Projects

 
 
What's the use of balmy weather and long summer days if you can't hang out in your yard and have some fun? But if there's nowhere good to sit and nothing fun to do at your house, don't fret. These 28 projects, culled from the TOH archives of great weekend upgrades, will enhance your yard, beautify your exterior, and give everyone in the family something exciting to do. Pick and choose the ones that are right for your home, and soon you'll have the most attractive and entertaining yard on the block.

Read the full article here

Friday, March 28, 2014

Roof Repair vs Roof Replacement: Which do I need?

www.roofingtalk.com
September, 2013

At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.

What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?         

Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.

• Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.

• Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.

• Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.

• Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.

• Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.

• Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.

Read the full article here
At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.
What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?          
Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.
Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.
Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.
Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.
Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.
Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.
Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.
- See more at: http://www.roofingtalk.com/blogs/roof-repair-vs-roof-replacement-which-do-i-need#sthash.fi8JUt4O.dpuf
At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.
What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?          
Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.
Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.
Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.
Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.
Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.
Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.
Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.
- See more at: http://www.roofingtalk.com/blogs/roof-repair-vs-roof-replacement-which-do-i-need#sthash.fi8JUt4O.dpuf
At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.
What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?          
Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.
Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.
Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.
Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.
Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.
Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.
Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.
- See more at: http://www.roofingtalk.com/blogs/roof-repair-vs-roof-replacement-which-do-i-need#sthash.fi8JUt4O.dpuf
At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.
What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?          
Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.
Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.
Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.
Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.
Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.
Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.
Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.
- See more at: http://www.roofingtalk.com/blogs/roof-repair-vs-roof-replacement-which-do-i-need#sthash.fi8JUt4O.dpufvv
At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.
What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?          
Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.
Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.
Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.
Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.
Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.
Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.
Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.
- See more at: http://www.roofingtalk.com/blogs/roof-repair-vs-roof-replacement-which-do-i-need#sthash.fi8JUt4O.dpuf

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

To Do It Yourself or Hire a Contractor?

Home Improvement Projects: Do It Yourself?  Or Not...  Take this quiz to find out!



Should you save money by doing the job yourself?  Do-it-yourself (DIY) jobs are a popular trend in the home improvement industry, however, before you grab a hammer and start swinging, you should know that this is a trend with a few potential problems. Before you decide to do-it-yourself, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) recommends taking this DIY quiz:

Read the full article here
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?v
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?v
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?

Friday, March 14, 2014

What you should know before you replace your windows

Replacement — or repaired — windows could save you in energy costs and increase your home's value. Here are tips for taking on a window project.

By Pat Mertz Esswein of Kiplinger


If your windows no longer enhance the fa├žade of your home, shield it from the elements or filter noise, there is no better time to update them. Retailers whose business withered as homeowners stopped spending on big home-improvement projects are ready to deal and eager to keep their installation crews working.

Many dealers have cut markups to the quick, says Susan Selman, who is with Schmidt Windows in suburban Chicago. Plus, the $1,500 tax credit for installing energy-efficient windows in your home, which will help defray some costs, expires at year-end.

Read the full article here

Monday, March 10, 2014

10 Home Maintenance Tips for Spring

A certified home inspector shares 10 home-maintenance tips for spring.

By Dwight Barnett, Scripps Howard News Service


After a long, dark winter, spring's bright sun and warm winds are, well, a breath of fresh air. The only downside? All that sunshine spotlights your leaf-filled gutters, cracked sidewalks and the dead plants in last year's flower beds. Dwight Barnett, a certified master inspector with the American Society of Home Inspectors, shared this checklist to help you target the areas that need maintenance so you can get your chores done quickly, leaving you time to go outside and play in the sunshine.

Read the full article here