Friday, March 28, 2014

Roof Repair vs Roof Replacement: Which do I need?

www.roofingtalk.com
September, 2013

At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.

What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?         

Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.

• Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.

• Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.

• Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.

• Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.

• Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.

• Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.

Read the full article here
At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.
What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?          
Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.
Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.
Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.
Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.
Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.
Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.
Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.
- See more at: http://www.roofingtalk.com/blogs/roof-repair-vs-roof-replacement-which-do-i-need#sthash.fi8JUt4O.dpuf
At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.
What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?          
Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.
Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.
Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.
Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.
Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.
Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.
Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.
- See more at: http://www.roofingtalk.com/blogs/roof-repair-vs-roof-replacement-which-do-i-need#sthash.fi8JUt4O.dpuf
At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.
What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?          
Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.
Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.
Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.
Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.
Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.
Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.
Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.
- See more at: http://www.roofingtalk.com/blogs/roof-repair-vs-roof-replacement-which-do-i-need#sthash.fi8JUt4O.dpuf
At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.
What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?          
Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.
Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.
Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.
Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.
Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.
Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.
Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.
- See more at: http://www.roofingtalk.com/blogs/roof-repair-vs-roof-replacement-which-do-i-need#sthash.fi8JUt4O.dpufvv
At what point should you consider replacing your roof, as opposed to fixing it? Variables in roofing materials and your particular situation will ultimately help decide, but we’ve put together some helpful questions to help you make that decision.
What is the age of your roof compared with its expected lifespan?          
Here is a quick guide for popular roofing materials.
Asphalt Shingles: This is the most common of residential roofing material and they generally last around 20 years. This could be less if you live in a hot, sunny climate.
Natural Slate: Found frequently on historical buildings and churches. These can easily reach 100 years or more.
Synthetic Slate: A relatively new material that gives the appearance of natural slate. It is a mixture of plastic and rubber than should last 50 plus years.
Cedar Shingles or Shakes: Expensive but beautiful, these have a limited lifespan of perhaps 25 years. Cedar Shingles can add significant value to the right home.
Synthetic Cedar Shingles: Creates a faux look of its natural sibling but with a longer lifespan. 50 years or more can be expected.
Metal: Gaining in popularity, today’s modern metal roofs can be expected to last at least 50 years.
- See more at: http://www.roofingtalk.com/blogs/roof-repair-vs-roof-replacement-which-do-i-need#sthash.fi8JUt4O.dpuf

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

To Do It Yourself or Hire a Contractor?

Home Improvement Projects: Do It Yourself?  Or Not...  Take this quiz to find out!



Should you save money by doing the job yourself?  Do-it-yourself (DIY) jobs are a popular trend in the home improvement industry, however, before you grab a hammer and start swinging, you should know that this is a trend with a few potential problems. Before you decide to do-it-yourself, the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) recommends taking this DIY quiz:

Read the full article here
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?v
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?v
Should you save money by doing the job yourself?

Friday, March 14, 2014

What you should know before you replace your windows

Replacement — or repaired — windows could save you in energy costs and increase your home's value. Here are tips for taking on a window project.

By Pat Mertz Esswein of Kiplinger


If your windows no longer enhance the fa├žade of your home, shield it from the elements or filter noise, there is no better time to update them. Retailers whose business withered as homeowners stopped spending on big home-improvement projects are ready to deal and eager to keep their installation crews working.

Many dealers have cut markups to the quick, says Susan Selman, who is with Schmidt Windows in suburban Chicago. Plus, the $1,500 tax credit for installing energy-efficient windows in your home, which will help defray some costs, expires at year-end.

Read the full article here

Monday, March 10, 2014

10 Home Maintenance Tips for Spring

A certified home inspector shares 10 home-maintenance tips for spring.

By Dwight Barnett, Scripps Howard News Service


After a long, dark winter, spring's bright sun and warm winds are, well, a breath of fresh air. The only downside? All that sunshine spotlights your leaf-filled gutters, cracked sidewalks and the dead plants in last year's flower beds. Dwight Barnett, a certified master inspector with the American Society of Home Inspectors, shared this checklist to help you target the areas that need maintenance so you can get your chores done quickly, leaving you time to go outside and play in the sunshine.

Read the full article here

Monday, February 24, 2014

Repairing a Leaky Outdoor Faucet or Hose Bib

By Gina Sanders on February 9, 2014

 

A task you may have to tackle from time to time is a leaky faucet. Not only do the ones inside your home leak once in a while, but the ones outside your home do as well. It is the exterior faucet hose bib we will take a look at herein.
A leaking faucet amounts to quite a significant amount of water waste, even if the leak is slow. In addition to adding expense to your water bill, should you live in an area where water is metered, all that excess water can make quite a mess of your yard. Even if the drip seems infrequent, accumulation is still possible over time. This means a nasty, muddy mess around the faucet area that can lead to unsightly erosion if not repaired.

Read the full article here

Friday, January 10, 2014

For Those Sad Souls in a Cold, Cold Home

By Austin Duck on January 10, 2014

Cold-House-BlogCover
My house is cold, y’all. Like, really cold. In fact, it’s so cold that my wife and I had to build a makeshift tent over our bed just to let our sleep-breathing warm us. I’m not even joking. And, from what I’ve noticed, that’s a major problem in the DC area. Any home from the early 1900’s (that hasn’t been dramatically remodeled) can have this problem because, around the turn of the century, you could open your windows, open your front door, and let the wind and sun and nature do all the work. Nowadays, however, that’s basically impossible.

Between the rise in home invasions, the shifting climate, and the fact that, well, we may have gone a little soft from all those years of central heat and air, it’s no longer viable to think that our home will heat or cool itself. Obviously, then, it’s a huge problem that many of our homes were designed with that in mind. My house, for example, has literally no insulation in the roof; further, during renovation, the attic was transformed into a master suite, so what once was a laborer’s one-bedroom house with attic buffer from the elements has become, through the miracle of modern renovation, a two-bedroom icebox (or convection oven, depending on the season).

Read the full article here

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Keeping Cool With a New Roofing System

By Homefix Corporation

If you live in or around the Maryland area, you likely experienced temperatures in or around 90 degrees over the weekend. If you are anything like me, this early taste of summer may have prompted you to close the windows and turn on the air conditioning system.


Buckley | Roofing by Homefix

If you noticed that your air conditioner was running almost constantly, especially if the indoor air temperature never reached the selected setting, you probably have an energy efficiency problem. This could be caused by cracks or gaps in the building structure, inefficient windows, or inefficient roofing.

A good way to test for inefficient windows in warm weather is to simply feel the window panes. If the glass or surrounding air is noticeably warmer than the rest of the room, then you will benefit greatly from replacement windows.

However, many people do not realize that an energy efficient roof can help cut energy costs, and maintain the proper temperature. In the same way that replacement windows resist heat gain (or loss, in the wintertime), replacement roofing resists solar heat gain in the summertime. This helps to maintain the indoor air temperature, which reduces the amount of work that your cooling system needs to perform, along with your energy expenses.

If you have any questions about energy efficient home improvements, such as roofing, replacement windows, or siding, visit HomefixCorporation.com!